The Write Stuff

One of my favorite grammar jokes goes, “The past, the present, and the future walk into a bar. It was tense.” As you join me in my overly-unbridled enthusiasm deep appreciation for the subtle witticisms that are grammar jokes like this one, you might wish to consider a related topic: verbs (and the time and action that they convey) are not the only sources of tension in your lives as graduate students. It has come to my attention that writing, in general, is a big headache for a lot of you. Thus part of my job as a Learning Specialist is to help you overcome these headaches by providing you with the necessary resources and strategies. And hey, I might even get you to like the writing process.

The key word here is process. Writing is—and should be—regarded as a process. It is rare that any person can sit down in front of his or her computer, tablet, or phone and construct a perfectly-crafted piece of writing on the first take. Many students fail to consider that the writing process is just that: one of drafting and revising…and drafting and revising again…and again…and (lastly) editing and proofreading.

You might think of the writing process like this:

wp1

Or this:wp2

Or this:

wp3

 

Which writing process is best? Whichever one works for you.  Each student’s writing process is unique. You will need to experiment to find what works best for you. Regardless of the process you use, there are similarities between each: drafting, revising, and editing. Some students find it extremely helpful to prewrite before they actually begin writing. Your last step in the process should be proofreading.

In the next post, we’ll go over these steps in greater detail. In the meantime, think about your own writing process: what works? What would you like to improve?

If you are needing assistance with strategies for efficient learning or writing, please feel free to contact the Academic Support Office at Touro University, California for a consultation or support.

One thought on “The Write Stuff

  1. […] In this post, we’re going to take a closer look at prewriting (you might want to read the first post in this series by clicking here). […]

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