Prewriting

In this post, we’re going to take a closer look at prewriting (you might want to read the first post in this series by clicking here).

Prewriting describes the work you do before you begin to write; these strategies can help you generate ideas. What are good prewriting strategies? Consider the following:

Brainstorming (Listing): Quickly jot down your thoughts and ideas as they come to you. Some writers like to use bullet points or list their ideas in short phrases. When you brainstorm, don’t worry about connecting or clearly expressing your thoughts. You’ll clarify what you’re trying to say later on. In the prewriting stage, it’s important to just RELAX and let your ideas flow without judgment or worry. (By the way, if you have a couple of minutes, try this technique for calming your mind prior to beginning your work).

Freewriting (Journaling): This strategy is similar to brainstorming in the sense that you’re focusing on getting your ideas and thoughts down on paper. While brainstorming resembles a list of short phrases, however, freewriting usually consists of full sentences. Think of freewriting like a journaling exercise. Don’t worry about grammar, spelling, or punctuation. Again, relax and let your ideas flow without judgment, worry, or censorship. If you can’t think of what to write, put that phrase down on your paper: “I can’t think of what to write.”

Clustering (Concept Mapping): Clustering helps you form associations between thoughts and ideas. Usually, you begin clustering with a single thought or idea in a circle in the middle of your paper. You then create a “map” of associated words/thoughts/ideas in other circles around the middle circle and draw lines to show the associations between the different words/thoughts/ideas. Take a look at the following example:

clustermap

 

So there you have it: three different prewriting strategies to try out on your next writing assignment. In our next installment, we’ll take a closer look at the next stage of the writing process.

Need help? Have some other ideas you’d like to try out? Stop by Academic Support at 690 Walnut Ave, #215.

Cheers,

Katie Brundage

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